Federal funding for obesity-nutrition research shoots up

Federal funding for obesity-related nutrition research has grown more than seven-fold over a 25-year period as food science research has nudged downwards, according to a recent government report. The number of projects rose from 78 in 1985 to 577 projects by 2009.

Nutrition research in food science, which includes food processing/preservation, has decreased from 226 projects in 1985 to 177 projects.

The figures and chart stem from a USDA report that came out earlier in the year that analyzed federally supported nutrition research from 1985 through 2009 (the latest year of available USDA data). Other findings from the report include: Continue reading


High-School SuperFoods Winner, trying new foods and fusion

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It’s that time of year, again. The dishes are in and the judges have made their decision; first place goes to… New York City’s Kristopher Lopez, whose execution of Faux –lafels proved to be a hit!

The AICR Healthy Recipe C-CAP Winner 2015For the last three years now, AICR has partnered with the C-CAP (Careers through Culinary Arts Programs) for their annual cooking competition. High school students enrolled in vocational culinary programs are encouraged to submit a recipe, given specific guidelines, in the hopes that they will have the winning recipe. This year students created small plates or appetizers that followed AICR’s evidence-based guidelines for lowering cancer risk.

Here, Kristopher shares his experience in the competition, what inspires him, and his plans for the future.

Was it challenging to develop a dish given AICR’s nutrition guidelines?

Yes, it was a little challenging because I was asked to work with ingredients that I was unfamiliar with and that I don’t really deal with coming from a Puerto Rican background. The development process involved a lot of research of ingredients as well as trial and error. Continue reading


Study: For Women, Young and Older, Alcohol Ups Breast Cancer Risk

Research clearly shows that alcohol increases risk for breast cancer overall. Now, a study published this week in the International Journal of Cancer finds that drinking alcohol increases risk for nearly all breast tumor types, especially when women start drinking as young adults. The risk is modest, but it shows one way women can take steps to lower their risk.alcohol-serving-sizes

Using data from the European Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study, researchers included 335,000 women from ten European countries and of those,11,576 participants had breast cancer diagnoses after an average of 11 years follow-up. Data on participants included BMI, waist to hip ratio, smoking status, physical activity, education level and diet information. The authors calculated how much alcohol women drank over their life, based on surveys the women filled out on what they drank in their 20s and beyond. About 15% of the women drank more than one alcoholic drink daily. Continue reading